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Slow Progress

The pace of work on the boat continues at glacial speed. When they say that boat projects take 3 times longer than you plan for, it is definitely true in my case, but mainly because I do everything 3 times! So far I replaced the forestay as I noticed it was frayed. To do that required a trip to West Marine. I’m luck as we have on in Nashville, or possibly unlucky as it makes it easier to spend all my money. It took a lot of time to get a new forestay as I wasn’t sure how to use their tools and they didn’t appear very experienced either. I was definitely worried that I’d end up with one that was wrong some how, but the rig tension is good.

The boat usually looks worse when I'm working on it.

The boat usually looks worse when I’m working on it.

The new mast step mod has taken a lot of time as well. I removed the old step and sealant then carefully drilled holes in the new rigging plate from Seals Spars and Rigging. The plan was for this to hold all of the blocks used in leading the lines aft to the cockpit. I positioned the rigging plate under the step and tried to reinstall the whole thing. Oops, bolts are not long enough. I found some substitutes, then tightened it down. When I went to raise the mast I discovered something that probably should have been super obvious sooner. The mast pivot bolt was blocked by the new rigging plate wings.  I decided to sleep on it. The next day, I decided to cut away a portion of the “wings” of the rigging plate on the starboard side since I only need 1 block attachment space at this time, and don’t plan on needing many more in the future.  That done, I had to clean up the new sealant  and with the new bolts was able to reinstall the mast step. Happily, it appears that it will work.

I could probably clean this area  up a bit by using double blocks but for now I'll just stick with the singles.

I could probably clean this area up a bit by using double blocks but for now I’ll just stick with the singles.

Port side of the mast rigging plate showing the areas I had to trim away.

Port side of the mast rigging plate showing the areas I had to trim away.

From the rigging plate, all of the lines will pass through Spinlock T25 deck organizers. These were the most affordable and came in different combinations. Plus, you can install a BE10 Bullseye on top of the T25’s so the jib sheets can pass over all the other lines. Perfect. The port side has only the jib halyard and downhaul, so a 2 sheave organizer was installed. It went well, except I spent a lot of time hunting down the proper hardware, first trying our local ACE (no luck) then Clarksville Fasteners ( forgot to account for the BE10 stacked and screws were thus too short) before finally discovering that Lowes has a nice stainless steel fastener section.

Jib side showing all parts installed. The white line is for the mast raising system but shows off the BE10 bullseyes.

Jib side showing all parts installed. The white line is for the mast raising system but shows off the BE10 bullseyes.

Close up of the Spinlock T25 organizer and BE10.

Close up of the Spinlock T25 organizer and BE10.

The starboard side with the main sail lines has still not been completed. I ordered a 4 sheave organizer, but one of the sheaves had fallen off. West Marine said they’d send out a replacement, but a week later I called back and discovered that some mixup had happened and they hadn’t sent it, possibly due to not having any in stock. I also realized that I need/want a  sheave organizer. So I had to find one at P2marine as WestMarine was all out. It should be here next week.

From the organizers the lines run through Spinlock XAS Clutches.  I tried cheaper clam cleats for the Jib, but discovered they had several huge shortcomings. So ultimately I went with the XAS Clutches despite their high cost and the fact that they are probably way overkill. A double sits on the port for the jib lines, and a I have a triple and double for the main. I decided to run the vang, a reefing line, downhaul, topping lift and main halyard through the clutches.

Starboard (main sail) side showing the clutches for up to 5 lines.

Starboard (main sail) side showing the clutches for up to 5 lines.

On the boom I raised the gooseneck three inches in hopes that it will clear the bimini while sailing, as well as be a little further away from our heads when swinging back and forth. I also installed a new outhaul setup on the boom. I’ll also be installing single line reefing for the main, but haven’t even started that.

Outhaul line components on boom.

Outhaul line components on boom.

Inside the boat, I plan to paint and work on the storage hatches that I installed prior to our Nashville cruise. Still lots of work there. I ran a wire from the switch panel to be able to turn off the 12 volt power outlet, but need to hook it to a power relay. I also want to install a 400 watt inverter with 2 power outlets as it is quieter than the 120 watt lighter plug in ones. But so far I need to find 8 gauge wire. WM as out of the red wire of course, and I just don’t want to be running black wire all over the place and calling it positive. That would be a negative.

Battery charging cable project nearly complete!

Battery charging cable project nearly complete!

Right now, I just charge the battery  with a battery tender plugged into the garage, but wanted to wire a quick disconnect plug to the battery that ran out somewhere that I could easily reach it. I decided to use the old hole for the power switch that the boat came with. I bought a quick disconnect pair that was wired up with a continuous loop of wire off of Amazon.com. You cut the wire loop in the middle, then wire one plug to your device, and the other plug to the charger (or whatever you want.) Yep, I got unlucky and wired the charger plug to the battery. My charger has the male plug as the positive, which meant I needed to wire the female plug to the battery positive. I got that wrong and had to redo it. As a final insult, the clam shell “vent” that I thought would cover up the hole and plug when not in use was too small!

Well, hopefully I can continue to work on projects for the boat and get everything ready for a bit of a sail in a week or two.

 

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