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Macgregor 26s Interior Mods

Here are most of the interior mods done to the interior of my Macgregor 26s. These make the boat pretty livable.

The interior of the main cabin.

The interior of the main cabin.

I’ll start at the lower left of the photo and work around in a clockwise fashion.  Under the port settee I’ve got two 10 gallon rubbermaid totes which help keep stuff organized and dry . I still use the original  hatch covers which need to be improved as the velcro doesn’t stick. This results in the cushions ending up on the floor when the boat heels a lot.  Susan covered the stock cushions with some fabric sewn onto the covers.  Pretty good idea. The curtain is held up with three snaps. The curtain can be partially unsnapped quickly removed if needed. I used snaps as sometimes you end up getting caught on the curtain and  I figured it was better to allow the curtain to be ripped down without being damaged. I still have the door that came with the boat but honestly, it was always in the way.

Here is the interior with the  table swung out and the stove open.

Here is the interior with the table swung out and the stove open.

The switch panel was installed in the space of the foam access panel rather than cutting more holes. I have wired up a propane alarm, the tiller pilot,  cabin lights, nav lights, depth finder, and an auxiliary 12V outlet. All of the wiring runs down near the sink area with a few exceptions. In addition, cabin lights are installed on the left and right sides of the cabin. They are not really visible during the day but are decent at night. The over kitchen dome light doesn’t work but I haven’t removed it. I remade the table using some poplar wood. It has raised edges to help keep stuff on the table while underway and is sized differently than the stock table. It is stiffer, and also bolted in through in a different location. Being mounted about 3/4 inch higher than stock, it allows the stove to remain in place when the table is closed. The stove is a Coleman propane stove and there is a block of wood to hold it in place as well.  Below that I’ve mounted a much bigger battery which required a new bracket, and there is a 7 gallon container of water under the sink as well. The sink faucet had to be replaced with some camping unit. I store the propane cylinders in the sink when not in use in hopes that any propane gas will drain through the sink.

Perfect position for the settee occupants.

Perfect position for the settee occupants.

In the right settee, I cut out a massive hatch with a hinged opening and stuffed two 10 gallon totes in there as well. The wiring all runs to under the sink and unfortunately it is not as clean as I would have liked, due to the fact that I added circuits one by one instead of all at once, so it wasn’t planned out as well as I would have liked. The most recent circuit was for the propane detector which is to the right of the black door. I installed it as low as possible in the area most likely to be the source of any leaks. It is switched but I switch it on when I get to the boat  and don’t switch it off until I leave.

Kitchen storage area showing hinged hatch.

Kitchen storage area showing hinged hatch.

In the above photo you can see the propane detector  in the lower left, and  how much storage space is available if you can simply get to it.  On the right is the 12V power outlet and one of the 1A2BC fire extinguishers on the boat. The hatch is a little beat up, but it actually was part of the Hita 17 deck!

This shows the rear of the  boat.

This shows the rear of the boat.

 

The rear of this boat is also quite spacious, but very low. You can see the fan I bought from Walmart for 11 bucks. I was so proud of myself especially since West Marine charges so much for theirs. Of course, my wife thinks the fan is extremely loud and then the fan stopped working all together. I think it was working for no more than 4 days after I bought it. Guess there is a reason West Marine charges so much for their fans. Granted now there is another  hole in the boat to deal with when I remove it. I’ll probably just put a West Marine fan in its place and wire it into interior light circuit. The orange twisty tie thingies hanging from the ceiling were for fishing rods but we don’t fish much from this boat. Under the cushions I screwed the 4 hatch panels together. The two rear are screwed to each other and each of the front hatches are then hinged to the rear ones. I admit I only put the rear cushions in the boat for the first time  recently and it is much more comfortable sleeping there than the settee! And the hatches being screwed together helped a lot when sailing. With the boat heeled past 25 degrees the rear hatch “assembly” shifted a bit but stayed in place. The OEM port hatches with the old ratty velcro fell out of place!

The V berth has a an 8 inch hatch installed to gain access to the bow area. I was able to install a new nav light and use the space to store the anchor rode for the Rocna anchor.

The vberth has a an 8 inch hatch installed to gain access to the bow area. I was able to install a new nav light and use the space to store the anchor rode for the Rocna anchor.

I’ve removed some of the flotation foam here and there. Most of it came from the bow area. I wanted to have a way to leave the heavy Rocna anchor in place with its long chain/rope anchor line, so an anchor deck pipe is located above this area. I’ll cover it more later when I cover the exterior mods. But with this hatch I could remove the bow foam. To make up for this I keep the extra life jackets inside the vberth storage area. On longer trips empty watch jugs will also be stored inside so they should make up for loss of foam flotation. In the rest of the boat, only a few pieces here and there have been removed.

Vberth showing LED strip lights.

Vberth showing LED strip lights.

Inside the vberth there are some LED strip lights. There are two here and two in the main cabin. Each pair has their own switch. Note how I tried to located them behind the various ridges in such as way so that they are not visible during the day. Since the vberth is much smaller, it appears a lot brighter than the main cabin. Hmmmm, maybe I should add a couple of more lights in the main cabin!

I enlarged the v berth hatch and also installed this massive hinged hatch on the port side. The starboard half is not hinged at this time. I just lift the other half out of the way or slide it over as needed.

I enlarged the v berth hatch and also installed this massive hinged hatch on the port side. The starboard half is not hinged at this time. I just lift the other half out of the way or slide it over as needed.

This shows the open hatch with all of the space used to store equipment.

This shows the open hatch with all of the space used to store equipment.

I enlarged the vberth storage so that you can now actually use it. Inside there are two more 10 gallon totes. I could also store a lot of extra water (more than 20 gallons) the extra life jackets, and an extra tool box. Much of the rope portion of the anchor line is actually pulled through and sits here, ready to go . The bitter end of the anchor line is tied to some sort of rope that is part of the fiberglass hull or hull liner.  Located up there is also the depth sounder. I used silicon sealant to attach it to the hull and it used to work really well, but lately it has been acting up.

The Theta curve porta toilet. Great toilet but honestly a bit tall for the boat.

The Theta curve porta toilet. Great toilet but honestly a bit tall for the boat.

 

Finally, I’ve got the head area. The original toilet was damaged so I tossed it and replaced it with the Thetford Curve. Great toilet as it has a 5.5 gallon holding tank with a 4 gallon flush tank. Some toilets had larger flush tanks than holding tanks which seemed like a bad idea. This one has electronic flush and is a decent size. It is a bit tall but it works out. As mentioned before I removed the door and replaced it with a curtain.

 

There are still a few things I’d like to do still. I want to add some ventilation to the vberth storage area so that if the anchor line is wet it will help to dry out. Susan wants a light in the toilet. Maybe a battery powered LED light would be easiest. I want a bit more light in the main cabin at night.  I want to add some way to ventilate the bilges and interior in case of a propane leak.  I want to do something with the left side hatches. Also an emergency bilge pump would be nice and finally some fans. Another problem area is the sink drain. It doesn’t drain very well as there is a kink in the factory tubing. But if the boat heels to more than 20-25 degrees to starboard the sink begins to fill up with water. Past 30-35 degrees it appears to slosh into the cabin. I want to make the drain straighter and either find a proper plug for the drain or just install a seacock. But we will see what takes priority as I think I want to do some exterior stuff first if I can find the funds.

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